Monday, April 16, 2018

ADF has their "great hopes" and I have mine

Blaine Adamson
Blaine Adamson, proprietor of Hands On Originals in Kentucky, demands the right to discriminate against LGBT people
Alliance Defending Freedom, an anti-LGBT hate group, represents a Kentucky print shop, Hands On Originals, owned by Blaine Adamson. According to American Family Association (another hate group): ADF has 'great hope' that biblical beliefs will stay in business.
Six years ago, Lexington, KY, printer Blaine Adamson (right) of Hands On Originals declined to print expressive shirts promoting the Lexington Pride Festival, hosted by the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization (GLSO), because he did not want to convey the messages printed on the shirts.

“It actually happened over the phone,” Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) attorney Jim Campbell tells American Family Radio's "Janet Mefferd Live" program. … Once [Adamson] found out what would be on it, that it would be words promoting this festival, he realized it was not something he could do. So he politely declined but quickly offered to send them, connect them to another print shop…
All it took was a phone call. ADF has boilerplate that their lawyers dutifully comply with. Refusals of service are always “polite” and there is always an offer (real or not) to refer the customer to another provider. There is no polite way to refuse service based on the sexual orientation or gender identity of the prospective customer. These people seem to think that their religious beliefs give them a civility pass.

The reason that ADF claims that their client offered to refer LGBT customer elsewhere (politely mind you) is to promote the idea that the services are available at outlets that don't mind dealing with evil queers. It is irrelevant.

Nondiscrimination laws prevent someone for having to shop around for services offered by public accommodations and Lexington-Fayette Urban County has such an ordinance in effect.

They got the “expressive” in there in order to justify a compelled speech claim. I am only surprised that they did not call this moron a “t-shirt artist.”

The county's Human Rights Commission found that the shop violated the nondiscrimination law. They appealed and won a decision is state court (I am trying to get a copy of the ruling). It is Kentucky, after all.
"We appealed to the state trial court there, and the state trial court reversed the Commission's decision and said that, 'No, Blaine does in fact have the right to live and work consistent with his religious beliefs,'" Campbell continues. "The Commission then took us up to the next level, where we again prevailed. But nevertheless, the Commission appealed to the Kentucky Supreme Court, and that's where we currently stand."
“Live and work consistent with his religious beliefs.” The quickest way to make the state reasonable is probably to come up with a group of African-Americans who make the best of something in the area but who refuse to sell it to white people because of their religious beliefs. I fail to see the difference between Adamson and some neo-Nazi who is an adherent of the Christian Identity Church.

Ultimately, this is yet another example of Christian Supremacy. One law for conservative Christians and another for everyone else. This is also an example of sheer stupidity.

Shirts for a Pride event are really rather innocent. Where exactly is the religious objection? Their book prohibits gay sex. A Pride event has nothing to do with sex. Or is it the pride that makes this guy so uncomfortable? Maybe he thinks about anal sex whenever he thinks about gay people.

Were it not for sanctimonious Christians and some nutty Jews we would not need Pride events in the first place. At the core of their belief is the idea that sexual orientation and gender identity are choices. Otherwise these folks would at least be indifferent to the concept that LGBT people are just as their god created them.

In the final analysis, must we be forced to re-conform laws in order to ensure that they respect the dictates of ancient chronicles that are wrong about so many things when subjected to literalism? I am wired for optimism so I remain hopeful that the Supreme Court of the United States will get this right in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado. That would put an end to this bullshit once and for all.

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