Friday, September 6, 2019

What is going on here? From magic spells to "gender ideology"

Emily Zinos
Emily Zinos is an anti-LGBTQ warrior for the faith without discernible credentials other than piety.
via YouTube
You have all probably read about the Nashville priest, Rev. Dan Reehil, who pulled Harry Potter books from the diocesan school because they contain real magic spells that could injure people. He reached that conclusion after consulting with several exorcists; experts worthy of inclusion on peer review panels no doubt.

Even in Tennessee, parents are in revolt claiming that the priest is unable to distinguish between what is real and what is fantasy. The majority of Catholics in the United States are enlightened and progressive. I am reminded that they supported marriage equality in percentages greater than the general public.

Father Reehil is a moron but he hasn't really done that much damage.

Denver's bishop, Samuel J. Aquila, is far more pernicious. He, along with Catholic Charities and Colorado Christian University, organized an event next week to address “the threats of gender ideology.” This has the potential to do real harm to real children and their families. It is no more scientifically appropriate than Father Reehil's magic spells.

The featured speaker at this event is Emily Zinos, an anti-transgender warrior for the faith. Zinos, lacking any semblance of critical thinking, has accepted the teachings of the Church and then, through selective observation, has found ways to bolster what amounts to willful ignorance.

According to promotional materials for the event:
This Minnesota-based mom and advocate helps parents and educators identify and address the threats of transgender ideology.
Exactly what qualifies Ms. Zinos to help anyone understand anything remains unknown. Apparently she is affiliated with the anti-transgender Ask Me First, MN which is a project of Minnesota Family Council in partnership with Family Policy Alliance. She is described on the MFC website as a consultant and also as a grassroots coordinator.

Supposedly, Ask Me First is about privacy. That is just pretext. It is about religious disapproval of LGBTQ people. Privacy is just an excuse — and not a very good one. At this point I suspect that Zinos believes her own bullshit.

A couple of years ago, Zinos wrote a tedious piece for Witherspoon Institute's pseudo-intellectual blog. She is a one-note opera. The drivel is a constant. The only qualifications Zinos cites is that she has seven children. I wonder how many of them are boys and whether or not Ms. Zinos is familiar with the fraternal birth order effect. But I digress.

Zinos is always a victim without considering — not for a second — the damage her bigotry has the potential to do to gender diverse children. There is no such thing as “transgender ideology.” It is no more real than Father Reehil's magic spells.

At the risk of being tedious myself, gender affirmation is the only means of mitigating the effects of acute gender dysphoria. The condition causes severe anxiety and depression. It is as deadly as some aggressive forms of cancer. That danger is abated with affirmation. Children should not suffer because of what amounts to superstition.

The fact that Zinos is at odds with medical science doesn't bother her in the least. She has probably convinced herself that, for example, the American Academy of Pediatrics is striving for political correctness — or some other excuse to will away scientific expertise that she doesn't like.

Suffice it to say, the woman is a virus. Next up on the agenda is Dr. Patrick Lappert. According to the program guide:
This Alabama-based plastic surgeon and deacon in the Catholic Church provides revelatory insight into transgender surgery.
Of course the fact that Lappert is a Catholic deacon has no bearing on his views. They can call Lappert a plastic surgeon but Dr. Lappert is not board certified in any medical specialty. Lappert failed to meet the continuing requirements of the American Board of Plastic Surgery to remain certified.

Dr. Patrick Walter Lappert practices out of Madison, Alabama. He is a 1983 graduate of the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences. I am reasonably certain that he has no transgender patients.

Exactly what Lappert knows about gender confirmation surgery is unknown. He offers no reason to believe that he knows any more about the procedure than my urologist. More importantly, what is the point? Lappert disapproves of gender confirmation surgery. Lappert will testify that it's bad — baaad! How does that have anything whatsoever to do with how we treat transgender and gender diverse people?

In the final analysis, these people want to pretend that transgender people do not exist; that they pose a peril to others and that there is some sort of incantation to make gender dysphoria disappear. All that is required is to know the magic word. “Abracadabra!” For her part Ms. Zinos is horrified that transgender children might be in her children's schools. It is a product of ignorance.

Dr. Lappert speaks with the authority of a medical doctor who is at odds with the American Medical Association. Gender confirmation is a subspecialty of plastic surgery. For hospital consent the surgeon is required to evaluate patients in accordance with WPATH guidelines. I would suspect that Lappert knows little or nothing about the WPATH Standards of Care.

Poor Father Dan Reehil. He is now a punchline but he is a true believer, as are Zinos and Lappert. Belief is based on faith. People with a medical condition deserve treatment according to medical science which is based on evidence. The science should extend to society. Redheads are not witches and transgender people pose a threat to no one.

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